DIY / Gardening / Self Sufficiency / Growing from Seed / In The Garden / Succession Planting

{Update} Succession Planning Tuesday

After my post on succession planning yesterday it has been brought to my attention (by the oh-so-helpful Linda) that, as suspected, my chilli seedling is not, in fact, a chilli.

Somewhat more shockingly, it has also been suggested that my capsicum is also a weed.

I have to admit I had my suspicion about the chilli, but I’m a tad disappointed about the capsicum. This meant that today I decided it was time to replant some chilli and capsicum seeds and hope that the hot weather over the next week doesn’t kill them!

IMG_20140129_192806

These were the two packets of seed I bought on impulse from a big box hardware store a while back and planted out hoping for, you know, capsicum and chilli. Today I fished the seeds out of the fridge (where I’ve been storing them) to plant some more. I only planted three pots of each, but with two seeds in each container in case one doesn’t take.

IMG_20140129_192841

That said, I then watered them a tad too violently and the seeds got washed around the pot slightly. Oops. I managed to find most of them and put them back to the centre of the pot, but there’s a few strays.

IMG_20140129_192905

A close up in case it turns out that the seeds aren’t capsicum and chilli seeds – though I have to admit they look very similar to the ones that I fish out of my capsicums with astonishing regularity prior to eating them.

In addition to the disaster that is my seedlings, rumor also has it that my volunteer tomato plants are not tomatoes. This I’m not as convinced about.

Here’s a photo of the potential volunteer tomato:

IMG_20140128_230639

And here’s a photo of the volunteer tomato that is definitely a tomato at about the same size.

IMG_20140128_230713

They look similar to me, but I’ll be keeping an eye on it in case it does turn out to be a stray weed.

I’ve also kept the weeds in their containers to see what they turn into – especially the grass one! I’ll let you know.

Have any of your ‘seedlings’ turned out to be ‘weedlings’? What did you do with them?

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “{Update} Succession Planning Tuesday

  1. I find the best way to identify a volunteer tomato, if you’re not sure, is by smell. The leaves have a really distinctive odour!

    • That’s what I thought – I tried bruising a leaf and it just smelled gross…so I did the same to the tomato, and same effect. Perhaps I need to try it *without* crushing the leaves first.

  2. Good luck with the new seeds! I went looking for some notes online, and there are some from the seed company that put germination temperatures at 20 to 25 degrees. The way mine have been behaving, I would have though it was higher.

    http://www.theseedcollection.com.au/Articles/Capsicum-How-to-grow-from-seed

    The trick with tomatoes is at the four-leaf stage the second set of leaves is definitely a compound leaf – in other words each leaf is made up of a number of leaflets before it joins the stem. No leaflets – not a tomato. I can generally pick them at the two-leaf stage, my garden and compost is so full of them, But a few escape. If I get time to weed, that is. I have left a few this year, and even transplanted some in the hope of getting Redortas, but with no luck. They are all turning into cherries. I reckon cherries have a higher density of seed to fruit of any plant on earth!

    • I only noticed these ones the other day – I swear they just leapt fully formed into my garden bed!

      Handy to know about the capsicum germination temp, though, thanks!

  3. Pingback: See How My Garden Grows: February 2014 | on the ning nang nong

  4. I am hopeless at growing tomatoes, capsicum and eggplants from seeds – mine all seem to get ‘stuck’ at the tiny stage and never get big enough to plant out. I was talking to Skud about my issues the other week and she gave me some god tips I’m going to try next time. However, this year on the advice of another blogger, I plonked some seeds straight into the ground. I only got about 50% germination but the have grown well once they did come up. Of course our crappy start to the summer – that non-existent Spring and cool December – has meant the eggplant and capsicum haven’t grown very quickly at all and I’m not sure I’ll get anything from them, but only time will tell.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s